The Thoughts of Gunnar


We Are of Our Father’s Making
November 16, 2013, 12:22 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

This is from a letter I recently wrote to a group of awesome folks.  Perhaps you will find it beneficial as well.  I know I personally do.  I need to read it myself often.

Dear Beloved Saints of (town name deleted),

 

as time was taken to inquire of His mind concerning some encouragements to write to you, I recalled the process by which fine dessert wines are made.

 

Dessert wine, if you have never had the chance to enjoy one, tastes much different than typical wine, mainly in that it is much, much sweeter.

 

The most popular dessert wines are made through a process called noble rot. As opposed to when grapes would be normally picked for the typical wine, the grapes are left on the vine.  While there, they end up getting attacked by a mold called the noble rot.  It can form and cover the grape rather well at times.  The grape will often begin to get into raisin mode in this process.

 

For some of the most valued dessert wines, the winemaker waits until literally the last minute before the grape will fall off of the vine (creating much more expense and resources dedicated to the wine-making process).  The grape is literally about to die…but at the last second, it gets captured and put into the hands of a talented winemaker who then, by the nature of those grapes or their fruit, as opposed to anything previously harvested, makes their sweetest wine of the season, often referred to as a ‘late harvest’ wine. Here in the states, many consumers of this type of wine save it for a special occasion.

 

What if our Lord, the Lord of the harvest Himself, wants to exercise His sweet tooth with you, His saints?  What if some of the misunderstandings, temporary discouragements,  or seeing others accomplish something while we seemingly wait, is actually part of the master winemaker’s perfect plan to let us all sit on the vine, even while we begin to rot, only to set us up for the last minute to be made into some of the sweetest wine ever produced?  What if, unbeknownst to us, we are not just rotting, but our rotting is actually noble? What if we have seen harvest in others all around and it tempts us to doubt, only to open us up to the realization that we were born for such a time as this, and in His grand banquet and grand scheme, we are destined to be mixed in with other brothers or sisters (“grapes”) into a late harvest wine, a wine that the winemaker goes to painstaking lengths, takes greater risks with, and puts more resources into than other wines?  What if, unbeknownst to us, it has all been an expression of His great favor on our lives?

 

Many folks actually do not have a taste for normal wine and have difficulty picking up on its nuances.  Dessert wines end up being more palatable to many due to its different characteristics.  Its highlights can often be more readily noted, even by the untrained palette.  And so it will be with those who are about to taste the wine that the Lord produces in the saints of (town name deleted)!

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